Difference between revisions of "Chthoniobacter"

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=Description=
 
=Description=
  
Chthoniobacter flavus is the only species in the Genus currently and was discovered in the soil of a rye grass and clover pasture in Victoria, Australia in 2002. The bacteria is gram negative and rod shaped, the cells are yellow and rod-shaped.  
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Chthoniobacter flavus is the only species in the Genus currently and was discovered in the soil of a rye grass and clover pasture in Victoria, Australia in 2002. The bacteria is gram negative and rod shaped, the cells are yellow and rod-shaped. Pure culture has been derived of the species. Closest relatives include a partial length sequence from forest soil (98.3%-99.5%), as well as Xiphinemato- bacter spp. (91.5%-92.2%), which is a ectoparasitic root nematodes found in soil.  
  
 
[[File:alcanivorax bork.jpg|300px|thumb|right|Alcanivorax borkumensis [1F] ]]
 
[[File:alcanivorax bork.jpg|300px|thumb|right|Alcanivorax borkumensis [1F] ]]

Revision as of 14:45, 7 May 2015

This student page has not been curated.

Classification

Domain: Bacteria Phylum: Verrucomicrobia Class: Spartobacteria Order: Spartobacteria Family: Chthoniobacter Genus: Chthoniobacter Species: Chthoniobacter flavus Ellin428

Description

Chthoniobacter flavus is the only species in the Genus currently and was discovered in the soil of a rye grass and clover pasture in Victoria, Australia in 2002. The bacteria is gram negative and rod shaped, the cells are yellow and rod-shaped. Pure culture has been derived of the species. Closest relatives include a partial length sequence from forest soil (98.3%-99.5%), as well as Xiphinemato- bacter spp. (91.5%-92.2%), which is a ectoparasitic root nematodes found in soil.

Alcanivorax borkumensis [1F]

Ecology and Significance

Genome Structure

7,848,700 base pairs long

61% GC Content

Metabolism

The family's only species is an aerobic chemohetertroph, this is because the species metabolizes organic carbon from plant biomass and uses chemical energy because it has no access to sunlight. It is important to remember that air is a component of soil and although depth and pore size affect oxygen concentration, soils are usually aerobic and therefore the microbe has access to oxygen.

References

[1] Sangwan, Parveen, Xiaolei Chen, Philip Hugenholtz, and Peter H. Janssen. “Chthoniobacter Flavus Gen. Nov., Sp. Nov., the First Pure-Culture Representative of Subdivision Two, Spartobacteria Classis Nov., of the Phylum Verrucomicrobia.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology 70, no. 10 (October 2004): 5875–81. doi:10.1128/AEM.70.10.5875-5881.2004.

[2]Kant, Ravi, Mark W. J. van Passel, Airi Palva, Susan Lucas, Alla Lapidus, Tijana Glavina del Rio, Eileen Dalin, et al. “Genome Sequence of Chthoniobacter Flavus Ellin428, an Aerobic Heterotrophic Soil Bacterium▿.” Journal of Bacteriology 193, no. 11 (June 2011): 2902–3. doi:10.1128/JB.00295-11.

Figures

[1F]

[1] [2F] [2] [3F] [3] [4F] [4] [5F] [Original Figure. Author: Pawan Dhaliwal] [6F]

http://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/File:Lorenzo.gif 

[7F] [5]

Author

Page authored by Chelsea Zegler, student of Prof. Katherine Mcmahon at University of Wisconsin - Madison.