Difference between revisions of "Clostridium tetani"

From MicrobeWiki, the student-edited microbiology resource
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
{Uncurated}}
+
{{Uncurated}}
 
{{Biorealm Genus}}
 
{{Biorealm Genus}}
  

Revision as of 20:03, 14 October 2011

This student page has not been curated.

A Microbial Biorealm page on the genus Clostridium tetani

Classification

NEUF2011 Kaitlyn Bergeron, Patrick Barrett, Jaclyn Egitto, Alexander Mastriano

Higher order taxa

Bacteria; Firmicutes; Clostridia; Clostridiales; Clostridiaceae

Species

Clostridium tetani

Description and significance

C. tetani is a bacillus, or rod-shaped bacterium. The bacteria is Gram positive and commonly takes the shape of a drumstick when Gram stained. This drumstick appearance is due to the spore formation that occurs inside the cell. C. tetani is known for causing tetanus. Spores of the bacterium enter the body through open wounds and germinate once inside. C. tetani move around by the use of rotary flagella. The organization of these flagella is peritrichous, which means there are flagella randomly assorted around the cell.

Genome structure

The genome of C. tetani consists of one chromosome of 2776 genes. All but one of these genes are protein-coding genes (99.96%). There are 2.7 mega base pairs in the genome.

Cell structure and metabolism

Interesting features of cell structure; how it gains energy; what important molecules it produces.


Ecology

Habitat; symbiosis; contributions to the environment.

Pathology

How does this organism cause disease? Human, animal, plant hosts? Virulence factors, as well as patient symptoms.

Current Research

Enter summaries of the most recent research here--at least three required

Cool Factor

Describe something you fing "cool" about this microbe.

References

[Sample reference] Takai, K., Sugai, A., Itoh, T., and Horikoshi, K. "Palaeococcus ferrophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a barophilic, hyperthermophilic archaeon from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 2000. Volume 50. p. 489-500.

Edited by student of Iris Keren