Flavivirus NS1 protein

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Introduction

Electron micrograph of the Ebola Zaire virus. This was the first photo ever taken of the virus, on 10/13/1976. By Dr. F.A. Murphy, now at U.C. Davis, then at the CDC.


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Legend/credit: Electron micrograph of the Ebola Zaire virus. This was the first photo ever taken of the virus, on 10/13/1976. By Dr. F.A. Murphy, now at U.C. Davis, then at the CDC.
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Introduce the topic of your paper. What microorganisms are of interest? Habitat? Applications for medicine and/or environment?

Flavivirus


By Alex Gonzales

File:Flavivirus Figure.jpg
Figure 1. Flavivirus Structure. (A) Schematic representation of a flavivirus particle. Left: immature virion; right: mature virion. The unstructured spherical capsid contains the positive-stranded genomic RNA and multiple copies of the capsid protein C. Immature virions are covered by spiky complexes of 60 trimers of prM-E heterodimers. The proteolytic cleavage of prM results in the reorganization of the E proteins and the formation of smooth-surfaced particles covered with 90 E dimers. sE: soluble form of E that lacks the membrane anchor and an adjacent sequence element called ‘stem’. M: Membrane-associated cleavage product of prM. (B) Herringbone-like arrangement of90 E protein dimers at the virion surface as determined by cryo-electron microscopy .