Difference between revisions of "Granulosis Virus"

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(Genome Structure)
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==Genome Structure==
 
==Genome Structure==
Describe the size and content of the genome. How many chromosomes?  Circular or linear?  Other interesting features?  What is known about its sequence?
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CpGV is a double stranded DNA virus with a circular genome. The genome is 123,500 bases with 143 open reading frames. 25 of the genes are unique to CpGV, while 118 are homologous to other ''Baculovirus'' species. CpGV encodes six genes required for genome replication, which includes DNA polymerase and helicase. It has genes for granulin/polyhedrin, which is a major protein involved in the formation of viral inclusion bodies. Auxiliary genes include proteases, such as chitinase, which are dedicated to the degradation of host structures and the prevention of host cell death.
 
 
  
 
==Cell Structure, Metabolism and Life Cycle==
 
==Cell Structure, Metabolism and Life Cycle==

Revision as of 23:41, 18 April 2018

This student page has not been curated.

Classification

NCBI: Taxonomy

Domain: Viruses

Group: dsDNA

Order: Unassigned

Family Baculoviridae

Genus: Betabaculovirus

Species

Cydia pomonella granulovirus

Description and Significance

Describe the appearance, habitat, etc. of the organism, and why you think it is important.

Genome Structure

CpGV is a double stranded DNA virus with a circular genome. The genome is 123,500 bases with 143 open reading frames. 25 of the genes are unique to CpGV, while 118 are homologous to other Baculovirus species. CpGV encodes six genes required for genome replication, which includes DNA polymerase and helicase. It has genes for granulin/polyhedrin, which is a major protein involved in the formation of viral inclusion bodies. Auxiliary genes include proteases, such as chitinase, which are dedicated to the degradation of host structures and the prevention of host cell death.

Cell Structure, Metabolism and Life Cycle

Interesting features of cell structure; how it gains energy; what important molecules it produces.


Ecology and Pathogenesis

Habitat; symbiosis; biogeochemical significance; contributions to environment.
If relevant, how does this organism cause disease? Human, animal, plant hosts? Virulence factors, as well as patient symptoms.

References

[Sample reference] Takai, K., Sugai, A., Itoh, T., and Horikoshi, K. "Palaeococcus ferrophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a barophilic, hyperthermophilic archaeon from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 2000. Volume 50. p. 489-500. 1. 2. Shuler ML, Granados RR, Hammer DA. Baculovirus Expression Systems and Biopesticides. New York: Wiley-Liss; 1995. 3. Fields BN, Knipe DM, Howley PM. Fields Virology. 6th ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013.

Author

Page authored by Ben Kelly and Ilise Kundel, student of Prof. Jay Lennon at IndianaUniversity.