Difference between revisions of "Haliangium ochraceum"

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(Genome Structure)
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==Genome Structure==
 
==Genome Structure==
Describe the size and content of the genomeHow many chromosomes?  Circular or linear?  Other interesting features?  What is known about its sequence?
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Haliangium ochraceum is an aerobic, obligate halophilic Gram-negative myxobacterium isolated from seaweed collected from a sandy beach in Kanagawa, Japan. Myxobacteria are unicellular bacteria that are characterized by complicated multicellular behaviors, such as feeding, social movement, aggregation, and fruiting body formation, which make them highly unusual.   
  
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Properties:
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Presence of flagella: Yes
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Human pathogen: No
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Interaction: No
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Number of membranes: 2
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Number of inteins:0
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(1.2 to 1.8 μm in diameter)
  
 
==Cell Structure, Metabolism and Life Cycle==
 
==Cell Structure, Metabolism and Life Cycle==

Revision as of 01:42, 31 March 2010

Classification

Bacteria, Proteobacteria, subdivisions: deltaproteobacteria, Myxococcales, Nannocystineae, Haliangiaceae, Haliangium, Haliangium ochraceum

Species

NCBI: Taxonomy

Genus species: Halangium ochraceum DSM 14365, Halangium ochraceum SMP-2

Description and Significance

Describe the appearance, habitat, etc. of the organism, and why you think it is important.

Genome Structure

Haliangium ochraceum is an aerobic, obligate halophilic Gram-negative myxobacterium isolated from seaweed collected from a sandy beach in Kanagawa, Japan. Myxobacteria are unicellular bacteria that are characterized by complicated multicellular behaviors, such as feeding, social movement, aggregation, and fruiting body formation, which make them highly unusual.

Properties: Presence of flagella: Yes Human pathogen: No Interaction: No Number of membranes: 2 Number of inteins:0


(1.2 to 1.8 μm in diameter)

Cell Structure, Metabolism and Life Cycle

Interesting features of cell structure; how it gains energy; what important molecules it produces.


Ecology and Pathogenesis

Habitat; symbiosis; biogeochemical significance; contributions to environment.
If relevant, how does this organism cause disease? Human, animal, plant hosts? Virulence factors, as well as patient symptoms.

References

[Sample reference] Takai, K., Sugai, A., Itoh, T., and Horikoshi, K. "Palaeococcus ferrophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a barophilic, hyperthermophilic archaeon from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 2000. Volume 50. p. 489-500.

Author

Page authored by _____, student of Prof. Jay Lennon at Michigan State University.