Racial Disparities in MRSA Infections

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By Amir Johnson

There is a long history of medical racism and socioeconomic inequality in the US, as well as a similarly long history of racial health disparities as a result. This can be seen in the case of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Racial disparities in the rates with which Black and White people contract MRSA have been observed for decades, however even with the decline in overall cases of MRSA thanks to strides in medical understanding these racial disparities persist. In this paper, I seek to illuminate the causes of this health disparity so as to gain the insight necessary to quell it.

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Section 4

Conclusion

Section 4

Include some current research, with at least one figure showing data.

MRSA cases by race, stratified by quartiles of US census data pertaining to income, housing, education, and health. Cases are depicted in increasing quartiles of census data, per 100000 persons for white (white bars) and black (black bars) persons.

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Section 1

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