Difference between revisions of "Methanogens in Hydroelectric Dams"

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(Introduction)
(Introduction)
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[[Image:Hoover_Dam.jpg|thumb|300px|right|Electron micrograph of the Ebola Zaire virus. This was the first photo ever taken of the virus, on 10/13/1976. By Dr. F.A. Murphy, now at U.C. Davis, then at the [http://www.cdc.gov/ CDC].]]
 
[[Image:Hoover_Dam.jpg|thumb|300px|right|Electron micrograph of the Ebola Zaire virus. This was the first photo ever taken of the virus, on 10/13/1976. By Dr. F.A. Murphy, now at U.C. Davis, then at the [http://www.cdc.gov/ CDC].]]
 
<br>By Claire Sears<br>
 
<br>By Claire Sears<br>
 
  
 
<br>Hydroelectric dams are often seen as a green, renewable energy solution to combat climate change; however, methanogenic bacteria growing in dam reservoirs produce methane, a greenhouse gas many times more potent than carbon dioxide. Only 3% of US reservoirs are hydroelectric. Others are for protection from floods and water storage. There is relatively little attention given to this source of greenhouse gas emission both in scientific study and in consideration of dam-building. So far, scientists have not had a standard and accurate way to measure emissions, but a study by Deemer et al. in 2016 developed a measurement strategy.<ref name=aa>[https://doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biw117 Deemer, B. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Li, S.; Beaulieu, J. J.; DelSontro, T.; Barros, N.; Bezerra-Neto, J. F.; Powers, S. M.; dos Santos, M.A.; Vonk, J. A.; Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoir Water Surfaces: A New Global Synthesis 2016. <i>BioScience</i>, 66:11:949-964.]</ref> This page will discuss the microbes responsible for the emissions from reservoirs and the factors that influence emission-levels, the measurement of emissions, and the implications for climate change and renewable energy innovation.<ref name=bb>[https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2016/nov/06/hydropower-hydroelectricity-methane-clean-climate-change-study Weiser, M. "The hydropower paradox: is this energy as clean as it seems?" 2016. The Guardian 6:2634-2637.]</ref><br>
 
<br>Hydroelectric dams are often seen as a green, renewable energy solution to combat climate change; however, methanogenic bacteria growing in dam reservoirs produce methane, a greenhouse gas many times more potent than carbon dioxide. Only 3% of US reservoirs are hydroelectric. Others are for protection from floods and water storage. There is relatively little attention given to this source of greenhouse gas emission both in scientific study and in consideration of dam-building. So far, scientists have not had a standard and accurate way to measure emissions, but a study by Deemer et al. in 2016 developed a measurement strategy.<ref name=aa>[https://doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biw117 Deemer, B. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Li, S.; Beaulieu, J. J.; DelSontro, T.; Barros, N.; Bezerra-Neto, J. F.; Powers, S. M.; dos Santos, M.A.; Vonk, J. A.; Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoir Water Surfaces: A New Global Synthesis 2016. <i>BioScience</i>, 66:11:949-964.]</ref> This page will discuss the microbes responsible for the emissions from reservoirs and the factors that influence emission-levels, the measurement of emissions, and the implications for climate change and renewable energy innovation.<ref name=bb>[https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2016/nov/06/hydropower-hydroelectricity-methane-clean-climate-change-study Weiser, M. "The hydropower paradox: is this energy as clean as it seems?" 2016. The Guardian 6:2634-2637.]</ref><br>

Revision as of 23:44, 27 March 2020

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Introduction

Electron micrograph of the Ebola Zaire virus. This was the first photo ever taken of the virus, on 10/13/1976. By Dr. F.A. Murphy, now at U.C. Davis, then at the CDC.


By Claire Sears


Hydroelectric dams are often seen as a green, renewable energy solution to combat climate change; however, methanogenic bacteria growing in dam reservoirs produce methane, a greenhouse gas many times more potent than carbon dioxide. Only 3% of US reservoirs are hydroelectric. Others are for protection from floods and water storage. There is relatively little attention given to this source of greenhouse gas emission both in scientific study and in consideration of dam-building. So far, scientists have not had a standard and accurate way to measure emissions, but a study by Deemer et al. in 2016 developed a measurement strategy.[1] This page will discuss the microbes responsible for the emissions from reservoirs and the factors that influence emission-levels, the measurement of emissions, and the implications for climate change and renewable energy innovation.[2]

Section 1

Include some current research, with at least one figure showing data.

Every point of information REQUIRES CITATION using the citation tool shown above.

Section 2

Include some current research, with at least one figure showing data.

Section 3

Include some current research, with at least one figure showing data.

Section 4

Conclusion

References



Authored for BIOL 238 Microbiology, taught by Joan Slonczewski, 2018, Kenyon College.