Pibocella ponti

From MicrobeWiki, the student-edited microbiology resource
Revision as of 14:50, 12 March 2014 by Monica.hodgkin (talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Classification

Higher order taxa

Domain: Bacteria Phylum: Bacteroidetes Class: Flavobacteria Order: Flavobacteriales Family: Flavobacteriaceae


Species

Pibocella ponti

Description

Pibocella ponti is a gram-negative rod shaped bacterium, with a cell size ranging in 0.4-0.5µm wide and 1.6-2.3µm long. Pibocella ponti is yellow pigmented and moves in a gliding motion. It lives in shallow marine environments and requires the presence of sodium ions to grow. The optimum temperature for growth to occur is between 21-23 degrees C. Growth strictly occurs in aerobic conditions. [1] Being heterotrophic and moderately halophilic, Pibocella ponti has a mutualistic relationship with the green algae Acrosiphonia sonderi in which it is found. As a species in the family Flavobacteriaceae, Pibocella ponti is considered a extremophile, as it can strives in the harsh conditions of the marine ecosystem.

Genome structure

Based on the 165 rRNA sequencing, Pibocella ponti shares genetic traits with other members in the Flavobacteriaceae family including; Aequorivita, Vitellibacter, Muricauda, and Zobellia. The specific strain of Pibocella ponti found, KMM 6031, closely relates to Maribacter aquivivus, Maribacter orientalis and Maribacter ulvicola, as it shares about 95% of the genetic information. [1]

Phylogeny differences

One major difference separating Pibocella ponti from the common characteristics of the Flavobacteriaceae family, it the absences of flexirubin pigment production.

Host

Pibocella ponti is found isolated in Acrosiphonia sonderi. This is a common species of green algae located in marine ecosystems. The specific strain of Pibocella ponti</> coming from Acrosiphonia sonderi was found in the Sea of Japan, thus acting as a host for Pibocella ponti, Acrosiphonia sonderi is also a halophile. [3]

Cell metabolism

Pibocella ponti can decompose starch, gelatin and casein. It cannot hydrolyze agar, DNA, urea or cellulose. Acid is produced as a waste product from maltose, but not from sucrose, lactose, or mannitol. Cytochrome oxidase enzyme is present acting as the terminal electron acceptor, as it is a strictly aerobic microbe. can decompose starch, gelatin and casein. It cannot hydrolyze agar, DNA, urea or cellulose. Acid is produced as a waste product from maltose, but not from sucrose, lactose, or mannitol. Cytochrome oxidase enzyme is present acting as the terminal electron acceptor, as it is a strictly aerobic microbe. [1]


Current Research

Pibocella ponti is one of the strains included in a research studying the effects of polyunsaturated aldehydes on marine bacteria. Pibocella ponti remain unharmed from polyunsaturated aldehydes. These aldehydes are produced from marine phytoplankton mainly diatoms, causing a detrimental effect on marine ecosystems. Most bacteria in the presence of these PUAs show growth stimulation, thus using PUAs as a product for metabolism. This leads to marine toxicity, harming organisms such as phytoplankton and invertebrates. [2]

References

[1] Nedashkovskaya, Olga I., Seung Bum Kim, Kang Hyun Lee, Kyung Sook Bae, and Galina M. Frolova. "Pibocella Ponti Gen. Nov., Sp. Nov., a Novel Marine Bacterium of the Family Flavobacteriaceae Isolated from the Green Alga Acrosiphonia Sonderi." International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. N.p., 30 July 2004. Web. 10 Mar. 2014. <http://ijs.sgmjournals.org/content/55/1/177.full>.

[2] Ribalet, Francois, Laurent Intertaglia, Philippe Lebaron, and Raffaella Casotti. "Differential Effect of Three Polyunsaturated Aldehydes on Marine Bacterial Isolates." Differential Effect of Three Polyunsaturated Aldehydes on Marine Bacterial Isolates. N.p., 30 July 2008. Web. 10 Mar. 2014. <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166445X07004110>.

[3] Kornmann, P.(1962). Eine Revision der Gattung Acrosiphonia. Helgoländer Wissenschaftliche Meeresuntersuchungen 8: 219-242, 11 figs.

Edited by Monica Hodgkin, student of Rachel Larsen at the University of Southern Maine