Talk:Anellovirus

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Introduction: Being that this was such a brief section, I felt that it could have been combined with Overview! Especially since some of the info (ex:single stranded, immune competence, etc) appear again nearly two sentences later.

Overview: I absolutely LOVED the brief descriptions of unfamiliar terms you included in this overview! This was very well written for a broad audience, and even as someone familiar with the field, it was great to have reminders here and there about what exactly you're referencing (ex: lipid envelope). The flow in the paragraph about capsids/crystal structure/replication is a little iffy, but I'm not sure how you might rearrange it to say what you're trying to say without sounding choppy. I also felt like you might have made a whole separate section about transmission and disease!

Genome: Pretty straightforward, felt well organized. You might move the figure of the genome (and connecting info) down to this section from the overview. The last two sentences were really interesting, but felt a bit thrown in at the end. I would love to hear more!

Potential Interactions with the Immune System: This section was so fascinating. I loved that you included the methods used to come to the conclusions the focus study came to. I also really appreciated the clinical relevance brought in by the last paragraph! Again, I felt that the genome info may have fit better in the genome section, but that's difficult because you're adding to the immune info you've just introduced. Also, could you maybe add a figure from your focus study to this section?

Correlation with Transplant outcomes: YES YES this section is the absolute best. This was the perfect answer to "why should we care?" and the figures you included were great choices for what you discussed in the section. Succinct descriptions of the results and discussions of the studies. This section is packed to the brim with info-- are subsections an option?

Conclusions: Not much to say, but maybe what kind of mutualistic interaction would they have? maybe I missed this info.


Altogether, a really phenomenal project. I loved the clinical relevance. May have been more drawn in by some better organization and a few more figures that aren't necessarily data... possible? Not sure. I also love learning about the history of these discoveries, but understand if that didn't reflect as something important in your own work. Great job miss Julia!

Kay Burrows